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‎DARWIN, CHARLES.‎

Reference : 54590

(1844)

‎Naturwissenschaftliche Reisen nach den Inseln des grÃŒnen Vorgebirges, Sudamerika, dem Feuerlande, den Faltland-Inseln, Chiloe-Inseln, Galapagos-Inseln, Otaheiti, Neuholland, Neuseeland, Ban Diemen's Land, Keeling-Inseln, Mauritius, St. Helena, den Vzo... - [FIRST TRANSLATION OF ANY OF DARWIN'S WORK]‎

‎Brunswick, F. Vieweg und Sohn, 1844. 8vo. 2 volumes bound in one contemporary half calf binding with gilt lettering to spine. Previous owner's stamp to front free end-paper. Light brownspotting throughout, especially to first and last leaves. XVI, 319, VIII, 301, (3) pp. + 1 folded map.‎


‎Rare first German translation of Darwin's Journal of researches, now known as Voyage of the Beagle, constituting the very first translation of any of Darwin's works into any language. As Darwin later recalled in his autobiography 'The voyage of the Beagle has been by far the most important event in my life and has determined my whole career'. "On its first appearance in its own right, also in 1839, it was called Journal of researches into the geology and natural history etc. The second edition, of 1845, transposes 'geology' and 'natural history' to read Journal of researches into the natural history and geology etc., and the spine title is Naturalist's voyage. The final definitive text of 1860 has the same wording on the title page, but the spine readsNaturalist's voyage round the world, and the fourteenth thousand of 1879 places A naturalist's voyage on the title page. The voyage of the Beagle first appears as a title in the Harmsworth Library edition of 1905. It is a bad title: she was only a floating home for Darwin, on which, in spite of good companionship, he was cramped and miserably sea-sick; whilst the book is almost entirely about his expeditions on land." (Freeman)Freeman 176‎

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‎DARWIN, CHARLES.‎

Reference : 53617

(1882)

‎Obrazovanie rastitel'nago sloa deatel'nost'u dozdevyh cervej i nabludenia nad obrazom zizni poslednih. [i.e. "Vegetable Mould and Worms"]. [Translated by:] Mihail Aleksandrovic Menzbir.‎

‎Moscow, S. P. Arkhipov. 1882. 8vo. In contemporary half calf. Wear to extremities and small stamp to upper right corner of title-page, internally fine and clean. IV, 186 pp.‎


‎Second Russian translation, published the same year as the first Russian and the year after the original English, of Dawin's "Vegetable Mould and Worms". "This last book is outside the main stream of Darwin's work, and reverts to his earlier geological interests. He had indeed published papers on mould in 1838 and in 1840. The book was remarkably successful, selling 6000 copies within a year, and 13000 before the end of the century". (Freeman). Freeman 1409‎

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‎DARWIN, CHARLES.‎

Reference : 54344

(1839)

‎Observations on the Parallel Roads of Glen Roy, and of other parts of Lochaber in Scotland, with an attempt to prove that they are of marine origin.‎

‎(London, Richard and John E. Taylor, 1839). 4to. Without wrappers. Extracted from "Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London.", 1839, Part I. Pp. 39-81 and 2 plates. (1 engraved map and 1 lithographed plate). Both plates with a few brownspots.‎


‎First appearance of Darwin's investigations of the geological phenomenon of the so-called "Parallel Roads" in Scotland."The first published description of the Parallel Roads was by Thomas Pennant in 1771 in his book A Tour of Scotland. This work was far from scientific but during the 19th century Glen Roy played an important role in the development of geological and geomophological theories of landscape evolution.1 Initially the 'Roads' were believed to be lake or marine shorelines. How they were formed in an area that was now high above the sea and without signs of a closed lake bed was a mystery. Initially it was thought that the shorelines were of marine origin and formed during a period when the sea reached levels of the Parallel Roads. Among the proponent of this theory were both Charles Darwin and Charles Lyell.2 It was in particular Darwin who was impressed by the geology of Glen Roy. In 1838 he wrote to Lyell, "I wandered the mountains in All directions and examined that most extraordinary district. I think without any exceptions, not even the first volcanic island, the first elevated beach, or the passage of the Cordillera, as so interesting to me as this week. It is far the most remarkable area I ever examined. ... I can assure you Glen Roy has astonished me".3 Darwin and Lyell proved to be wrong in this matter." (Jan Oosthoek). Freeman 1653.‎

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‎DARWIN, CHARLES.‎

Reference : 56990

(1844)

‎Observations on the Structure and Propagation of the genus Sagitta. - ["ONE OF THE MOST ANOMALOUS ANIMALS IN THE WORLD"]‎

‎London, Taylor and Francis, 1844. 8vo. In a nice later half morocco binding with five raised bands and gilt lettering to spine. Blind stamped to upper outer corner of first leaf of table of contents. In "The Annals and Magazine of Natural History", volume 13. A very fine and clean copy. [Darwin's paper] pp. (1)-6 + 1 plate. [Entire volume:] viii, [1] - 528 + 14 plates (4 hand-coloured).‎


‎First edition of Darwin's paper on marine arrow worms collected by him on his voyage on the Beagle. It is one of Darwin's early papers on invertebrates, which was originally intended for publication in The Zoology of the Voyage of HMS Beagle. Described by Darwin as "one of the most anomalous animals in the world," the origin of these strange carnivorous animals, which Darwin found highly interesting, is still unresolved. These early works are rarely seen on the market. The plate, drawn by Darwin, is based on his drawings made during the Beagle Voyage.Darwin arrived back in England from his voyage around the world on the Beagle in October 1836. He immediately set about writing up the results of the expedition-first, his general account, the Journal of the Beagle, and then, publishing the scientific observations and collections he had made while on the Beagle. The majority of these were published in the Zoology-including parts on mammals, fish, birds, and reptiles but Darwin ran out of funds beforehe could bring out the volume on invertebrates:"Darwin undertook to provide a comprehensive programme for the publication of the zoological results of the Beagle voyage - he obtained a Treasury grant to pay for the necessary engravings, and, having enlisted the leading taxonomical specialists in the several fields, he superintended the publication of the Zoology of the voyage of H.M.S. Beagle from February 1838 to October 1843 - The work comprises five parts: Fossil Mammalia, by Richard Owen; Mammalia, by G. R. Waterhouse; Birds, by John Gould; Fish, by Leonard Jenyns; and Reptiles, by Thomas Bell-a total of nineteen quarto issues. Darwin contributed a substantial portion of the text, drawing uponhis field notes for geological and geographical data and for the descriptions of the habits and habitats of the species - Darwin had originally planned to include descriptions of invertebrates in the Zoology but the exhaustion ofthe government grant forced him to abandon the idea. Instead he decided to publish his own observations and descriptions of the specimens that he considered to be important new discoveries, and did so in articles on Sagitta finished during the autumn of 1843, and Planariae, described in 1844" (Burkhardt 1986 p. xv.).PROVENANCE: From the collection William Pickett Harris, Jr. (1897 - 1972) (pencil note on p. iii). American investment banker and biologist. Following a career in banking, Harris was appointed Associate Curator of the Museum of Zoology at the University of Michigan in 1928. "[Harris] played a highly important role in developing mammalogy and systematic collections of mammals at the University of Michigan" (Hooper p. 923).Freeman 1664.‎

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‎DARWIN, CHARLES.‎

Reference : 56501

(1872)

‎Om Arternes Oprindelse ved Kvalitetsvalg (Danish) + Arternes Oprindelse gjennem naturligt Udvalg (Norwegian) + Om Arternas Uppkomst genom naturligt Urval (Swedish). - [INTRODUCTION OF THE "ORIGIN" IN SCANDINAVIA]‎

‎KjÞbenhavn [Copenhagen], 1872 - (Kristiania [Oslo], 1890) - Stockholm, 1871. A very nice and harmonious set, in four excellent half calf bindings.1) The Danish translation: 1 volume 8vo. A nice contemporary half calf with gilding to spine and gilt title-label. Only light wear. Internally some light brownspotting. (19), XIII, 605, (1) pp.2) The Norwegian translation: 2 volumes small 8vo. Bound in two excellent, uniform, recent red morocco bindings in pastiche-style, with gilt lines to spines. The work is printed in quite bad paper, which is always yellowed and quite brittle. Thus, the first title-page has two small restorations from verso, far from arrecting printing. The second title-page had an old owener's signature and a previous owner's stamp. 379, (5); 383 pp.3) The Swedish translation: 1 volume large 8vo. Bound uncut and with the extremely scarce original front wrapper in a lovely later brown half morrocco binding in contemporary style, with five raised bands and gilt author and year to spine. Front wrapper bound on a strip at inner hinge and with a missing outer coner (far from affecting printing). Old owner's name to front wrapper. An excellent copy. XI, (1), 420 pp.‎


‎A magnificent collection of first editions of the first Danish, Norwegian and Swedish translations of Darwin's masterpiece "The Origin of Species", together constituting the introduction to "The Darwinian Revolution in Scandinavia".The first Scandinavian translation to appear was the Swedish, which is also the rarest of the three. Darwinism was strongly opposed in Sweden, where the primary reaction to the work came from religious institutions that were outraged and fiercely fought against spreading the ideas presented in "origin" in their country. The second Scandinavian translation to appear was the Danish, which was translated in 1872 by the then young botanist J. P. Jacobsen, who was soon to become one f Scandinavia's most celebrated and influential authors. He received world-wide fame as the author of "Marie Grubbe" and "Niels Lyhne", which founded literary naturalism in Europe. "In the early 1870's, however, he was still dedicated to science. In 1873 he received the University of Copenhagen's Gold Medal for his work on desmids, single-celled green freshwater algae. The Descent of Man was also translated by Jacobsen and appeared in 1874-75."Darwin's ideas found great resonance in scientific circles in Denmark, and his ideas were immediately recognized. "In the early 1870s [With the Danish translation] the literary critic Georg Brandes started promoting Darwin's ideas as part of his liberal ideology and soon Darwinism became the mark of a new generation of intellectuals. Both the Steenstrup circle and the Brandes circle held Darwin in high esteem, but made completely different attributions to his theory. Consequently they both decided to raise money separately for the same Darwin. Darwin had borrowed the collection of barnacles from the Zoology Museum in Copenhagen with the help of Steenstrup. As a compliment Darwin sent him a signed copy of the Origin. Steenstrup acknowledged Darwin as an important fellow naturalist, but like many of his colleagues at the University of Copenhagen he never accepted evolutionary theory. The initial scientific reaction to Darwin's work on evolution by means of natural selection was respectful, but made few converts. memorial in 1882. Independently, Darwinism transformed as it became part of popular culture. " (KjÊrsgaard, Darwinism comes to Denmark).The Norwegian translation was the last of the three to appear, but it is quite scarce and very difficult to come by. It was published by businessman and publisher Johan SÞrensen (1830-1918) as a part of 'Bibliothek for de tusen hjem' (Library for Every Home)."The first volume came out at the end of 1889, in five parts and a total of 379 pages. Each part cost 30 Þre, making a total price of 1 kroner 50 Þre. The following year, 1890, the second volume appeared and this consisted of four parts totaling 383 pages and cost 1 kroner 20 Þre. The books were translated from the English sixth and final edition by the Master of the Arendal Public Secondary College, Ingebret Suleng (1852-1928)" (Glick, The Reception of Charles Darwin in Europe).1. The Danish translation: Om Arternes Oprindelse ved Kvalitetsvalg eller ved de heldigst stillede Formers Sejr i Kampen for TilvÊrelsen. Efter Originalens femte Udgave oversat af J.P. Jacobsen. KjÞbenhavn, Gyldendalske Boghandel (F. Hegel), 1872. 8vo. (10),XIII,605,(1) pp. - Freeman No 643 (Freeman with wrong collation, as he omits half-title and content-leaves).2. The Norwegian translation: Arternes Oprindelse gjennem naturligt Udvalg eller de bedst skikkede Formers bevarelse i Striden for Livet. Oversat efter Originalens VI. Udgave af Ingebret Suleng. (I-) II. (Kristiania), Bibliothek for de tusen hjem. Fagerstrand pr. HÞvik, (1890). Small 8vo. (1-3)4-379,(4);(1-3)4-383 pp. - Not in Freeman.3. The Swedish translation: Om Arternas Uppkomst genom naturligt Urval eller de bÀst utrustade Rasernas BestÃ¥nd i Kampen fÃr Tillvaron. ÃfversÀttning frÃ¥n femte Originalupplagan af A.M. Selling. Stockholm, L.J. Hiertas FÃrlagsexpedition, 1871. (I-IV)V-XI,420 pp., 1 plate. - Freeman No 793 (Freeman having the wrong year of publication and not mentioning the plate).‎

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‎DARWIN, CHARLES.‎

Reference : 48762

(1872)

‎Om Arternes Oprindelse ved Kvalitetsvalg eller ved de heldigst stillede Formers Sejr i Kampen for TilvÊrelsen. Efter Originalens femte Udgave oversat af J.P. Jacobsen. - [FIRST DANISH EDITION OF "THE ORIGIN OF SPECIES".]‎

‎KjÞbenhavn, Gyldendalske Boghandel (F. Hegel), 1872. 8vo. Bound in contemporary half calf with gilt lettering to spine. Spine rubbed. A few light brownspots throughout. Otherwise a fine and clean copy. (10), XIII, 605, (1) + 1 plate.‎


‎The Scarce first Danish edition (translated from the 5. edition) of Darwin's monumental "On the Origin of Species". "In 1872 the book was translated into Danish by the young botanist J. P. Jacobsen. He was soon to become a celebrated novelist famous for Marie Grubbe - A Lady of the Seventeenth Century (1876) and Niels Lyhne (1880). In the early 1870's, however, he was still dedicated to science. In 1873 he received the University of Copenhagen's Gold Medal for his work on desmids, single-celled green freshwater algae. The Descent of Man was also translated by Jacobsen and appeared in 1874-75. "In the early 1870s [With the Danish translation] the literary critic Georg Brandes started promoting Darwin's ideas as part of his liberal ideology and soon Darwinism became the mark of a new generation of intellectuals. Both the Steenstrup circle and the Brandes circle held Darwin in high esteem, but made completely different attributions to his theory. Consequently they both decided to raise money separately for the same Darwin. Darwin had borrowed the collection of barnacles from the Zoology Museum in Copenhagen with the help of Steenstrup. As a compliment Darwin sent him a signed copy of the Origin. Steenstrup acknowledged Darwin as an important fellow naturalist, but like many of his colleagues at the University of Copenhagen he never accepted evolutionary theory. The initial scientific reaction to Darwin's work on evolution by means of natural selection was respectful, but made few converts. memorial in 1882. Independently, Darwinism transformed as it became part of popular culture. "(KjÊrsgaard, Darwinism comes to Denmark)Freeman: 643. (PMM 344 - first edition)‎

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‎DARWIN, CHARLES.‎

Reference : 52105

(1872)

‎Om Arternes Oprindelse ved Kvalitetsvalg eller ved de heldigst stillede Formers Sejr i Kampen for TilvÊrelsen. Efter Originalens femte Udgave oversat af J.P. Jacobsen. - [FIRST DANISH EDITION OF "THE ORIGIN OF SPECIES".]‎

‎KjÞbenhavn, Gyldendalske Boghandel (F. Hegel), 1872. 8vo. Bound in contemporary half calf with 4 raised bands and gilt lettering to spine. Spine rubbed. A few light brownspots throughout. Otherwise a fine and clean copy. (10), XIII, 605, (1) + 1 plate.‎


‎The Scarce first Danish edition (translated from the 5. edition) of Darwin's monumental "On the Origin of Species". "In 1872 the book was translated into Danish by the young botanist J. P. Jacobsen. He was soon to become a celebrated novelist famous for Marie Grubbe - A Lady of the Seventeenth Century (1876) and Niels Lyhne (1880). In the early 1870's, however, he was still dedicated to science. In 1873 he received the University of Copenhagen's Gold Medal for his work on desmids, single-celled green freshwater algae. The Descent of Man was also translated by Jacobsen and appeared in 1874-75. "In the early 1870s [With the Danish translation] the literary critic Georg Brandes started promoting Darwin's ideas as part of his liberal ideology and soon Darwinism became the mark of a new generation of intellectuals. Both the Steenstrup circle and the Brandes circle held Darwin in high esteem, but made completely different attributions to his theory. Consequently they both decided to raise money separately for the same Darwin. Darwin had borrowed the collection of barnacles from the Zoology Museum in Copenhagen with the help of Steenstrup. As a compliment Darwin sent him a signed copy of the Origin. Steenstrup acknowledged Darwin as an important fellow naturalist, but like many of his colleagues at the University of Copenhagen he never accepted evolutionary theory. The initial scientific reaction to Darwin's work on evolution by means of natural selection was respectful, but made few converts. memorial in 1882. Independently, Darwinism transformed as it became part of popular culture. "(KjÊrsgaard, Darwinism comes to Denmark)Freeman: 643. (PMM 344 - first edition)‎

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‎DARWIN, CHARLES.‎

Reference : 57932

(1954)

‎O Nastanek Vrst. (Slovene, i.e. "Origin of Speices").‎

‎Ljubljana, Slovenski KnjiPni Zavod, 1954. 8vo. In publisher's original full green cloth binding with gilt lettering to spine and gilt decoration to front board. In the original green printed dust-jacket. Dust-jacket with a few nicks and tear, otherwise a fine copy. 461, (3) pp. ‎


‎Second printing of the first Slovene translation of Darwin's 'Origin of Species. Freeman F2427.OCLC only locates 1 copy outside Slovenia (Italy).‎

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‎DARWIN, CHARLES.‎

Reference : 30253

(1860)

‎On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of favoured Races in the Struggle for Life. Fifth Thousand.‎

‎London, John Murray, 1860. Orig. full blindtooled green cloth, back gilt. Front endpapers slightly splitting, a contemporary library sticker pasted on upper frontcover. Corners slightly bumped, edges very slightly rubbed, otherwise a good copy. IX (including halftitle),502 pp. + Advertisements: 32 pp. and 1 folded lithographed diagram. A few brownspots to the first leaves and to the last leaves of the advertisements. Otherwise clean and fine and uncut.‎


‎Second edition (second issue - the first issue only known in a few copies) - of one of the most influential works ever written, introducing THE DARWINIAN REVOLUTION."The philosopher John Passmore (1983) recently pointed out that only one intellectual revolution - the one brought about by Darwin - has been dignified by the suffix -ism. Hence we have Darwinism, but not Newtonianism, Maxwelllism, Planckism, Einsteinism, or Heisenbergism. This exceptional status is justified, for it would be difficult to refute the claim that the Darwinian revolution was the greatest of all intellectual revolutions in the history of mankind. Its importence lies in the fact that Darwin caused the overthrow of some of the basic beliefs of his age. Furthermore, and this is only now fully realized, Darwin established the basis for entirely new approaches in philosophy." (Ernst Mayr in "Towards a New Philosophy of Biology. Cambridge, 1988" p. 162).Of this second edition 3000 copies were printed. "The new edition is only a reprint, yet I have made a few importent corrections." (Darwin in a letter). Freeman No 376 with "Fifth Thousand" on titlepage - binding: variant a. Dibner No 199. Horblit No 23b (1. edition) Sparrow No 49 (1. edition). Printinig and the Mind of Man: 344 b.‎

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‎DARWIN Charles‎

Reference : 45065

‎ON THE STRUCTURE AND DISTRIBUTION OF CORAL REEFS.‎

‎London, Walter Scott, The Camelot series, sans date ( circa 1900 ) , in-8 hardcover, XXIV + 278 pp, carte dépliante en frontispice. Quelques figures et planches hors-texte. Ex-dono. Cover in good condition, inside very good.‎


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‎DARWIN, CHARLES. ‎

Reference : 56000

(1864)

‎O Proischozhdenii Vodov... [Russian: On the Origin of Species]. Perevel c anglijskago [translated from English by] S.A. Rachinsky. - ["THE MOST IMPORTANT BIOLOGICAL BOOK EVER WRITTEN" (FREEMAN)]‎

‎S.-Peterburg, 1864. 8vo. Bound in a beautiful recent pastiche-binding of brown half calf with marbled papers over boards and elegant gilding to spine. End-papers renewed. A few dampstains and a bit of brownspotting throughout. A nice copy. XIV, 399, (1) pp. + 1 plate.‎


‎Rare first edition of the first Russian translation of Darwin's "Origin of Species", a main reason for the widespread effect of Darwinism in Russia, where the theory met less resistance in the 1860'ies than it did in Western Europe. In Russia, Darwinism had a profound influence not only upon the different sciences, but also on philosophy, economic and political thought, and the great literature of the period. For instance, both Tolstoy and Dostoevsky referenced Darwin in their most important works, as did numerous other thinkers of the period."In 1864, S.A. Rachinsky, professor of plant physiology at St. Petersburg University, produced the first Russian translation of the "Origin". Although not a masterpiece of translation art, the book sold out so quickly that in 1865 it went through a second printing. By this time Darwin's ideas were discussed not only by scientists but also by such popular writers as Dmitri Pisarev and M. A. Antinovich." (Glick, p. 232). Rachinsky began translating the "Origin" in 1862 and wrote an important article on the theories presented in it, while working on the translation. This article and the translation of the "Origin" into Russian were responsible for the great success and rapid, widespread knowledge of Darwinian theory of evolution in Russia. "Darwin was concerned that the "Origin of Species" reach naturalists across the world, but translations of that complicated work raised problems for Darwin. If he found it difficult to make the reader "understand what is meant" in England and America, at least in those two countries he and the reader were discussing the "Origin of Species" in the same language. Foreign language editions raised not only the thorny question of translating Darwinian terms, but also the problem of translators, who often thought it proper to annotate their editions to explain the "significance" of Darwinism. The first Russian translation of the "Origin of Species" (1864) appeared, however, without any comment whatever by the translator, Sergei A. Rachinsky, professor of botany at the University of Moscow. Rachinsky had begun the translation in 1862 and published an article on Darwinism while continuing work on the translation in 1863." (Rogers, p. 485). In the year of publication of the translation, 1864, Pisarev wrote a long article in "The Russian Word", which purports to be a review of this translation; the critic complains about the absence of notes and commentaries by the translator. Pisarev furthermore points to several errors in the translation and to numerous infelicities of expression. Acknowledging the importance of the work, however, and of the spreading of Darwinism in Russia, he goes on in his own essay to provide a much more popular account of Darwin's theory and to impress upon his readers its revolutionary significance.Nikolai Strakhov also reviewed the translation immediately upon publication, acknowledging the effect it would have. Strakhov, however, recognized potential dangers inherent in the theory and expressed them in his review of Rachinsky's translation. He praised the work for its thoroughness and rejoiced in the evidence that man constituted the highest stage of organic development; but then he went on to argue that by moving into questions of philosophy and theology, the Darwinists were exceeding the limits of scientific evidence. Like Pisarev, Tolstoy enthusiastically embraced Darwinism. "The first mention of Darwin in Tolstoy's literary "Nachlass" is found in one of the drafts to "War and Peace". There Darwin is listed, apparently quite favorably, among leading thinkers "working toward new truth" [...] Thus by the late 1860's the name of Darwin as a leading scientist was already familiar to Tolstoy and duly respected." (McLean, p. 160). A fact which is often overlooked is that Tolstoy actually knew Rachinsky quite well. Interestingly, it was in a letter to Rachinsky, in reply to a question about the structure of "Anna Karenina", that Tolstoy made the famous statement (that all Tolstoy scholars and lovers know by heart): "I am proud of the architecture - the arches are joined in such a way that you cannot discover where the keystone is". Like Strakhov, however, Dostoevsky, acknowledging the significance of the "Origin", saw the dangers of the theory. In the same year as the publication of Rachinsky's translation, he lets the narrator in "Notes from Underground" (1864) launch his attack on Darwinism , beginning: "As soon as they prove you, for instance, that you are descended from a monkey, then it's no use scowling, you just have to accept it."In "Crime and Punishment" (two years later, 1866) the Darwinian overtones inherent in Raskolnikov's theory of the extraordinary man are unmistakable. He describes the mechanism of "natural selection," where, according to the laws of nature, by the crossing of races and types, a "genius" would eventually emerge. In general, Darwinian themes and Darwin's name occur in many contexts in a large number of Dostoevsky's works.Freeman: 748. See: James Allen Rogers: The Reception of Darwin's Origin of Species by Russian Scientists. In: Isis, Vol. 64, No. 4 (Dec., 1973), pp. 484-503.Thomas F. Glick: The Comparative Reception of Darwinism. 1974.Hugh McLean: In Quest of Tolstoy. 2008.‎

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‎DARWIN, CHARLES. ‎

Reference : 55761

(1913)

‎Origem das EspÃcies. [i.e. Portuguese: "Origin of Species"]. - [FIRST PORTUGUESE TRANSLATION OF 'ORIGIN OF SPECIES'.]‎

‎Oporto, Livraria Chardron, de Lello y Irmao, (1913). 8vo. Partly uncut in the original printed wrappers. Spine cracked and front hindge with repair. Wrappers with a few nicks. Half-title with previous owners names. Internally fine and clean. XVI, 477 pp.‎


‎The first edition, in the rarely seen wrappers, of the first Portuguese translation of Darwin's "Origin of Species". The comparatively late translation is partly due to the Portuguese 'Frenchism' at the time. The first French translation appeared in 1862 and was also widely circulated in Portugal. It also appears that the translator, a doctor and professor (who was also a Mason, a self-proclaimed poet, and the founder of the Spiritist Society of Portugal) named Joaquim [Marques] Dá Mesquita [Montenegro] Paúl (1875-1946), used the French translation rather than the English original. This apparently led to a number of errors and mis-translations that rendered the work unfaithful, to say the least. Unfortunately, this translation continued to be reprinted for the rest of the century in the Portuguese speaking world, oftentimes by simply changing the name of the translator for a spurious name. The first Brazilian edition, in 1973, turned out to be nothing but an exact reproduction of the text of the Portuguese translation. It appears that even in the 21st century many of the purported new translations were still reprints of the first Portuguese edition. A proper translation from the English was made in 1982, but it was apparently condensed from the 6th ed. (1872). In 1985 a complete translation was published, but it was based on the first ed. (1859). In 2011 and 2014, finally, two different translations were published in Brazil that appear to be more legitimate, which, as a commentator avers (see links below) doesn't necessarily guarantee that they are faithful. Thus, the Portuguese OSS bibliography remains murky and convoluted to this day, and it appears to be a continuing saga. Therefore this late, defective first translation, seems to have been crucial to the understanding-or misunderstanding- of Darwin's OSS for Portuguese readers for the remainder of the century, and then some.The uncertainty regarding the publication year is quite puzzling for a modern book. Freeman (online) gives three different numbers (F743, F743a, and F743b, the latter being 1961 and 1990, both of which are by the same translator as the first), and he gives the date "[?192-]" and 1920 to the first. The entry in the Biblioteca Nacional de España states "1924", and two Brazilian libraries give "1900's" and the rather wide ranging "1910-1992," a Portuguese university library states "1900-80," and the Biblioteca Nacional de Portugal says "1900." The year 1925 is given to the only two copies in US libraries, the American Philosophical Society and The Huntington. In the links below, the commentators assign it to the year 1913, and even though they don't justify that date, they seem to be quite familiar with Portuguese OSS editions in general. The date 1913 is also given by Ana Leonor Pereira in "The Reception of Darwin in Portugal (1865-1914)" Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia T. 66, Fasc. 3, EvoluÃão, Ãtica e Cultura / Evolution, Ethics and Culture (2010), pp. 643-660, which perhaps makes it more plausible As a final note, the 1961 translation at the Huntington purportedly by Eduardo Fonseca, is one of those spurious reprints with a made up name mentioned earlier. (http://catalog.huntington.org/record=b1703473 )(For a few commentaries on the different editions and on various Portuguese OOS translations and purported translators, see:http://observatoriodaimprensa.com.br/armazem-literario/_ed802_lendo_darwin_em_portugues/ andhttp://naogostodeplagio.blogspot.com/2009/10/miseria-pouca-e-bobagem.html )Freeman 743 ‎

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‎DARWIN, CHARLES.‎

Reference : 57927

(1957)

‎Originea Speciilor, prin selectie naturala sau pastrarea raselor favorizate in lupta pentru existenta. (i.e. Romanian "Origin of Species"). - [FIRST COMPLETE ROMANIAN TRANSLATION OF DARWIN'S "ORIGIN OF SPECIES"]‎

‎(Bucharest), National Academy, 1957. Folio. With the original printed wrappers in publisher's full cloth with gilt lettering to spine and gilt ornamentation to spine forming 6 compartments. A fine copy. (2), LXXXIV, 398, (2) pp. [plate with genealogical tree included in the pagination].‎


‎Rare first complete Romanian translation of Darwin's "Origin of Species". A preliminary and incomplete translation was made and published in 1950 (48 pp,. which also included a biography of Darwin [Freeman 746]).Freeman 747.‎

Herman H. J. Lynge & Son - Copenhagen

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DKK22,500.00 (€3,017.74 )

‎DARWIN, CHARLES.‎

Reference : 53577

(1877)

‎OrÃgen de las especies. Por medio de la seleccion natural ò la conservacion de las razas. Favorecidas en la lucha por la existencia. Traducida con autorizacion del autor de la sexta y última edicion inglesa por Enrique Godinez. - [THE FIRST SPANISH "ORIGIN OF SPECIES"]‎

‎Madrid, Perojo, (1877). 8vo. In the original green full cloth binding with gilt lettering and blindtooling to spine and front board. Gilding on spine faded. Privious owner's small stamp to front free end paper (Luis Quer Anguera). First and last few leaves with brownspotting, otherwise an overall very nice, clean copy. VII, (1), 573 pp. + 1 folded plate (after p. 128).‎


‎The exceedingly rare first edition of the first Spanish translation of Darwin's "Origin of Species", including two letters of Darwin that are not published elsewhere (not present in any English printing nor in any of the other translations). The first Spanish "Origin" is arguably the scarcest of all the translations of the work and very few copies of it are known. A second edition appeared later the same year, also published in Madrid, but by Rojas (it has 589 pp.). A 28-page long torso of a translation, which was suspended and had no further dissemination, had appeared in a periodical in 1872. "Unlike what had been the case in England, Darwin did not first become widely known in Spanish-speaking countries for the account of his travel around the world but was controversially introduced by the impact his "Origin of the Species" was having everywhere else. It is true, however, that his name was already familiar among scientists and intellectuals but it was "The Origin of the Species" and its translations that made him a household name. ... The full authorized version of "The Origin of Species" was finally translated in 1877 by Enrique GodÃnez. It had Darwin's endorsement and it was published with a letter from him, where he expressed being glad to have the book translated into Spanish because that would mean that it might be known not only "in the large kingdom of Spain" but also "in the widest extended regions where spanish [sic] is spoken" (Zabalbeascoa, 1968, p. 275).It took almost twenty years to have Darwin's best known work translated into Spanish while the German, French and Italian-speaking readership had had their own versions of "The Origin of Species" since 1860, 1862 and 1875 respectively (Núñez, 1969, p.27). We know it was not due to the author's unwillingness. Brisset states that after the success of "The Origin of Species" he communicated to his publisher that he wished his ideas be known abroad (2002, p. 178). This gap reveals that Spain was definitely lagging behind in spreading Darwin's ideas. We could attribute this tardiness to the "governmental and ecclesiastical pressure" that Dale J. Pratt mentions when he states that "open discussion was all but impossible" (2001, p. 26). It all changed after the Revolution of September 1868, which brought more openness to new ideas and the secularization of education.The situation in other Spanish-speaking countries was no different as regards the delay in the dissemination of Darwin's theory. Most of them were under a very strong Catholic influence and the idea of man descending from monkeys, as it was shallowly communicated, was as hard to swallow as when other visionaries had dared to say that the Earth was round or that the planets revolved around the Sun. Even today, almost 150 years after the publication of "The Origin of Species", the debate is no less controversial and very much alive when some conservative groups in certain parts of the United States aim at having the theory of evolution banished from the school curriculum to have the idea of intelligent design taught instead, as mentioned previously." (Elisa Paoletti, Translations as Shapers of Image: Don Carlos Darwin and his Voyage into Spanish on H.M.S. Beagle. In: "Ãrudit", Volume 18, nr. 1, 2005, pp. 55-77). OCLC locate 4 copies (two of them in the US): the Huntington Library, National Library of Medicine, The Universidad de Navarra and The Library at The Royal College of Surgeons of England.Freeman: 770 Blanco & Llorca: 34 (Blanco & Llorca: BibliogrfÃa crÃtica illustrada de las obras de Darwin en españa, (1857-2005). ‎

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DKK120,000.00 (€16,094.64 )

‎DARWIN, CHARLES.‎

Reference : 53732

(1877)

‎OrÃgen de las especies por medio de la seleccion natural, Ã, Conservacion de las razas en su lucha por la existencia‎

‎Madrid, Josà de Rojas, (1877 or 1880). 8vo. In (the original?) half calf binding with 4 raised bands and gilt lettering to spine. Title and author embossed in gilt lettering to front board. Stamp to title-page and 1 quire detached (pp. 115-126, otherwise fine and clean. (2), X, (2), 559 pp. + folded plate. [Freeman wrongly collate X, 589 pp.].‎


‎The exceedingly rare second edition of the first Spanish translation of Darwin's "Origin of Species", this edition being corrected and rewritten in impersonal passive constructions (as opposed to the first Spanish edition being translated in personal) and a portrait of Darwin has been added. As the first edition (Freeman 770), this copy is of the utmost scarcity and very few copies of it are known. OCLC list only four copies (one in Puerto Rico and three in Barcelona), Blanco & Llorco lists two in Barcelona, one in Madrid and one in Valencia - no copies are listed in US libraries. The date of publication is disputed; Freeman lists 1877 whereas Blanco & Llorco says 1880."Unlike what had been the case in England, Darwin did not first become widely known in Spanish-speaking countries for the account of his travel around the world but was controversially introduced by the impact his "Origin of the Species" was having everywhere else. It is true, however, that his name was already familiar among scientists and intellectuals but it was "The Origin of the Species" and its translations that made him a household name. ... The full authorized version of "The Origin of Species" was finally translated in 1877 by Enrique GodÃnez. It had Darwin's endorsement and it was published with a letter from him, where he expressed being glad to have the book translated into Spanish because that would mean that it might be known not only "in the large kingdom of Spain" but also "in the widest extended regions where spanish [sic] is spoken" (Zabalbeascoa, 1968, p. 275).It took almost twenty years to have Darwin's best known work translated into Spanish while the German, French and Italian-speaking readership had had their own versions of "The Origin of Species" since 1860, 1862 and 1875 respectively (Núñez, 1969, p.27). We know it was not due to the author's unwillingness. Brisset states that after the success of "The Origin of Species" he communicated to his publisher that he wished his ideas be known abroad (2002, p. 178). This gap reveals that Spain was definitely lagging behind in spreading Darwin's ideas. We could attribute this tardiness to the "governmental and ecclesiastical pressure" that Dale J. Pratt mentions when he states that "open discussion was all but impossible" (2001, p. 26). It all changed after the Revolution of September 1868, which brought more openness to new ideas and the secularization of education.The situation in other Spanish-speaking countries was no different as regards the delay in the dissemination of Darwin's theory. Most of them were under a very strong Catholic influence and the idea of man descending from monkeys, as it was shallowly communicated, was as hard to swallow as when other visionaries had dared to say that the Earth was round or that the planets revolved around the Sun. Even today, almost 150 years after the publication of "The Origin of Species", the debate is no less controversial and very much alive when some conservative groups in certain parts of the United States aim at having the theory of evolution banished from the school curriculum to have the idea of intelligent design taught instead, as mentioned previously." (Elisa Paoletti, Translations as Shapers of Image: Don Carlos Darwin and his Voyage into Spanish on H.M.S. Beagle. In: "Ãrudit", Volume 18, nr. 1, 2005, pp. 55-77). Freeman 771Blanco & Llorco 35‎

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DKK25,000.00 (€3,353.05 )

‎DARWIN, CHARLES.‎

Reference : 57758

(1914)

‎O vzniku druhu prÃrozenÃœm vÃœberem cili zachovávánÃm vhodnÃœch odrud v boji o zivot / Charles Darwin ; dle sestÃho, velmi opravenÃho vydánà anglickÃho, poslednÃho, jez vyslo za zivota autorova prelozil Fr. Klapálek. [Czech - i.e. On the Origin of Specie... - [FIRST CZECH TRANSLATION OF DARWIN'S "ORIGIN OF SPECIES"]‎

‎Praha, Nakladatelstvem AutorovÃœm. V Komissi Knihkupectvà I.L. Kobra, 1914. 8vo. Uncut in the original printed wrappers. Wrappers with wear. Lower part of front wrapper with a 10 cm long tear. Bookblock spilit in two. Internally fine and clean. 389, (1) pp. + 1 folded plate.‎


‎First Czech translation of Darwin's landmark "Origin of Species" which predates the Latvian, Armenian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Romanian and Slovenian translations by several years. The translator, FrantiÅ¡ek Klapálek (1863â1919) was a prominent entomologist, founding member and the first chairman of the Czech Entomological Society. Four institutional copies located: U. Okla, U. Tex., Czech NL, and Olomouc RL.Freeman 641‎

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DKK32,000.00 (€4,291.90 )

‎DARWIN, CHARLES.‎

Reference : 53279

(1871)

‎Proiskhozhdenie chelovieska i polovoi podbor [i.e. English "Descent of Man"]. - [FIRST TRANSLATION OF DARWIN'S 'DESCENT OF MAN' INTO ANY LANGUAGE]‎

‎S.-Peterburg, Izdanie redaktsii zhurnala "Znanie, 1871. 8vo. In contemporary black half calf with four rasied bands and gilt lettering to spine. Corners of binding with repairs and a three cm long tear to lower front hindge. Light miscolouring throughout, especially to first 10 leaves. (2), VII, (6), 439 pp.‎


‎The exceedingly rare first Russian translation of Darwin's 'Descent of Man' published only four month after the original English. The Russian publisher was eager to have a translation published, hence this early abridged edition - two other Russian translations followed later the same year - The present translation being the very first into any language. "The Descent of Man showed that the process of organic evolution, propelled by the struggle for existence and natural selection, applied to man no less than to the rest of the animal kingdom. It gave explicit recognition to the idea of the anthropoid origin of man. This claim surprised no one, for it was clearly hinted at in the great work of 1859 and was elaborated in Thomas Huxley's Man's Place in Nature and Vogt's Lectures on Man. Nor was it much of a surprise when three Russian translations of The Descent appeared within one year after the publication of the English original. Two general ideas represented the essence of The Descent: natural selection is not only behind the physical survival of man but also behind the evolution of cultural values; and the differences between animal and human behavior are differences of degree rather than of kind." (Darwin in Russian Thought) "The Expression helped lay the foundations for a scientific study of the psychological aspect of the evolution of species. The book appeared in a Russian translation only a few months after the publication of the English original. The paleontologist Vladimir Kovalevskii was the translator, and the embryologist Aleksandr Kovalevskii was in charge of editorial tasks. In 1874 Vladimir wrote to Darwin that nearly two thousand copies of the Russian translation were sold." " The Expression deals much more extensively with selected aspects of human and animal behavior than with general problems of evolutionary biology. The Russian reviewers were generally impressed with Darwin's descriptions and categorizations of animal behavior. The Journal of the Ministry of Public Education was unusually profuse in praising the book's content and writing style. The reviewer commended Darwin's impartiality and avoidance of "materialistic trappings." Even the adherents of spiritualism could read the book, he wrote, without the least discomfort. The reviewer thought that psychologists would benefit from the information the book presented on the "physiological" basis of behavior. Indeed, he recommended the book to all readers interested in the scientific foundations of human behavior. The liberal journal Knowledgewas equally laudatory. It noted that the book was eminently successful on two counts: it offered a "rational explanation" of many expressions of human emotions, and it integrated the study of animal and human behavior into the universal process of organic evolution. In fact, no educated person could afford to ignore it.N. P. Vagner, professor of zoology and comparative anatomy at St. Petersburg University, called The Expression a book with "great strengths and minor flaws." The volume reminded him of Darwin's previous works, which marked "turning points in the history of science." The strength of the book lay much more in its suggestion of new topics for comparative-psychological research than in a presentation of a theoretically and logically integrated system of scientific thought. Insufficient exploration of the physiological underpinnings of mental activities represented the book's major shortcoming" (Darwin in Russian Thought) In Russia Darwinism had a profound influence not only upon the different sciences, but also on philosophy, economic and political thought, and the great literature of the period. For instance, both Tolstoy and Dostoevsky referenced Darwin in their most important works, as did numerous other thinkers of the period.Like Strakhov, however, Dostoevsky, acknowledging the significance of the "Origin of Species", saw the dangers of the theory. In the same year as the publication of Rachinsky's translation, he lets the narrator in "Notes from Underground" (1864) launch his attack on Darwinism , beginning: "As soon as they prove you, for instance, that you are descended from a monkey, then it's no use scowling, you just have to accept it."In "Crime and Punishment" (two years later, 1866) the Darwinian overtones inherent in Raskolnikov's theory of the extraordinary man are unmistakable. He describes the mechanism of "natural selection," where, according to the laws of nature, by the crossing of races and types, a "genius" would eventually emerge. In general, Darwinian themes and Darwin's name occur in many contexts in a large number of Dostoevsky's works.'Descent of Man' was transted into Danish, Dutch, French, German, Italian, Polish, Russian and Swedish in Darwin's lifetime. Freeman 1107.‎

Herman H. J. Lynge & Son - Copenhagen

Phone number : +45 33 155 335

DKK32,000.00 (€4,291.90 )

‎DARWIN, CHARLES. ‎

Reference : 56375

(1871)

‎Proiskhozhdenie chelovieska i polovoi podbor [i.e. English "Descent of Man"]. - [FIRST TRANSLATION OF DARWIN'S 'DESCENT OF MAN' INTO ANY LANGUAGE]‎

‎S.-Peterburg, Izdanie redaktsii zhurnala "Znanie, 1871. 8vo. In recent half calf with four rasied bands and gilt lettering to spine. Soiling and damp stain to title-page. Light brownspotting throughout. (2), VII, (5), 439, (7) pp.‎


‎The exceedingly rare first Russian translation of Darwin's 'Descent of Man' published only four months after the original English. The Russian publisher was eager to have a translation published, hence this early abridged edition - two other Russian translations followed later the same year - The present translation being the very first into any language. "The Descent of Man showed that the process of organic evolution, propelled by the struggle for existence and natural selection, applied to man no less than to the rest of the animal kingdom. It gave explicit recognition to the idea of the anthropoid origin of man. This claim surprised no one, for it was clearly hinted at in the great work of 1859 and was elaborated in Thomas Huxley's Man's Place in Nature and Vogt's Lectures on Man. Nor was it much of a surprise when three Russian translations of The Descent appeared within one year after the publication of the English original. Two general ideas represented the essence of The Descent: natural selection is not only behind the physical survival of man but also behind the evolution of cultural values; and the differences between animal and human behavior are differences of degree rather than of kind." (Darwin in Russian Thought) "The Expression helped lay the foundations for a scientific study of the psychological aspect of the evolution of species. The book appeared in a Russian translation only a few months after the publication of the English original. The paleontologist Vladimir Kovalevskii was the translator, and the embryologist Aleksandr Kovalevskii was in charge of editorial tasks. In 1874 Vladimir wrote to Darwin that nearly two thousand copies of the Russian translation were sold." " The Expression deals much more extensively with selected aspects of human and animal behavior than with general problems of evolutionary biology. The Russian reviewers were generally impressed with Darwin's descriptions and categorizations of animal behavior. The Journal of the Ministry of Public Education was unusually profuse in praising the book's content and writing style. The reviewer commended Darwin's impartiality and avoidance of "materialistic trappings." Even the adherents of spiritualism could read the book, he wrote, without the least discomfort. The reviewer thought that psychologists would benefit from the information the book presented on the "physiological" basis of behavior. Indeed, he recommended the book to all readers interested in the scientific foundations of human behavior. The liberal journal Knowledgewas equally laudatory. It noted that the book was eminently successful on two counts: it offered a "rational explanation" of many expressions of human emotions, and it integrated the study of animal and human behavior into the universal process of organic evolution. In fact, no educated person could afford to ignore it.N. P. Vagner, professor of zoology and comparative anatomy at St. Petersburg University, called The Expression a book with "great strengths and minor flaws." The volume reminded him of Darwin's previous works, which marked "turning points in the history of science." The strength of the book lay much more in its suggestion of new topics for comparative-psychological research than in a presentation of a theoretically and logically integrated system of scientific thought. Insufficient exploration of the physiological underpinnings of mental activities represented the book's major shortcoming" (Darwin in Russian Thought) In Russia Darwinism had a profound influence not only upon the different sciences, but also on philosophy, economic and political thought, and the great literature of the period. For instance, both Tolstoy and Dostoevsky referenced Darwin in their most important works, as did numerous other thinkers of the period.Like Strakhov, however, Dostoevsky, acknowledging the significance of the "Origin of Species", saw the dangers of the theory. In the same year as the publication of Rachinsky's translation, he lets the narrator in "Notes from Underground" (1864) launch his attack on Darwinism , beginning: "As soon as they prove you, for instance, that you are descended from a monkey, then it's no use scowling, you just have to accept it."In "Crime and Punishment" (two years later, 1866) the Darwinian overtones inherent in Raskolnikov's theory of the extraordinary man are unmistakable. He describes the mechanism of "natural selection," where, according to the laws of nature, by the crossing of races and types, a "genius" would eventually emerge. In general, Darwinian themes and Darwin's name occur in many contexts in a large number of Dostoevsky's works.'Descent of Man' was transted into Danish, Dutch, French, German, Italian, Polish, Russian and Swedish in Darwin's lifetime. Freeman 1107.‎

Herman H. J. Lynge & Son - Copenhagen

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DKK28,000.00 (€3,755.42 )

‎DARWIN, CHARLES. ‎

Reference : 55995

(1922)

‎Put Jednoga Prirodoslovca Oko Zemlje. Part 1 (All that was published).‎

‎Zagreb, Tisak Kr. zemaljske tiskare, 1922. 8vo. Partly uncut in the original printed wrappers. Wrappers with light wear a few nicks. Internally fine and clean. (4), (1)-165‎


‎Rare first appearance in Serbo-Croatian of Darwin's 'Journal of Researches' - being the only work of any of Darwin's translated into this language. The present translation was never completed, thus only the first part 1. The full translation was not made until 1949.In 1945 the decision to recognize Croatian and Serbian as separate languages was reversed in favor of a single Serbo-Croatian or Croato-Serbian language. Today, for political/nationalistic reasons, there is a general opposition to the concept of Serbo-Croatian as a common pool/family. "On its first appearance in its own right, also in 1839, it was called Journal of researches into the geology and natural history etc. The second edition, of 1845, transposes 'geology' and 'natural history' to read Journal of researches into the natural history and geology etc., and the spine title is Naturalist's voyage. The final definitive text of 1860 has the same wording on the title page, but the spine readsNaturalist's voyage round the world, and the fourteenth thousand of 1879 places A naturalist's voyage on the title page. The voyage of the Beagle first appears as a title in the Harmsworth Library edition of 1905. It is a bad title: she was only a floating home for Darwin, on which, in spite of good companionship, he was cramped and miserably sea-sick; whilst the book is almost entirely about his expeditions on land." (Freeman).Not in Freeman‎

Herman H. J. Lynge & Son - Copenhagen

Phone number : +45 33 155 335

DKK12,000.00 (€1,609.46 )

‎DARWIN, CHARLES.‎

Reference : 53280

(1949)

‎Putovanje jednog prirodoslovca oko svijeta. - [ONLY TRANSLATION OF DARWIN INTO SERBO-CROATIAN]‎

‎Zagreb & Beograd, Novo Pokoljenje, 1949. Small4to. In publisher's original half cloth with printed lettering and ornamentation to spine. A ship decorating front board. Hindges very weak and first quire partly detached. 577, (6) + frontiespiece.‎


‎Rare first complete Serbo-Croatian translation of Darwin's 'Journal of Researches' - being the only translation of any of Darwin's into this language. It was reprinted in 1951, 1964 and 1966.In 1945 the decision to recognize Croatian and Serbian as separate languages was reversed in favor of a single Serbo-Croatian or Croato-Serbian language. Today, for political/nationalistic reasons, there is a general opposition to the concept of Serbo-Croatian as a common pool/family. "On its first appearance in its own right, also in 1839, it was called Journal of researches into the geology and natural history etc. The second edition, of 1845, transposes 'geology' and 'natural history' to read Journal of researches into the natural history and geology etc., and the spine title is Naturalist's voyage. The final definitive text of 1860 has the same wording on the title page, but the spine readsNaturalist's voyage round the world, and the fourteenth thousand of 1879 places A naturalist's voyage on the title page. The voyage of the Beagle first appears as a title in the Harmsworth Library edition of 1905. It is a bad title: she was only a floating home for Darwin, on which, in spite of good companionship, he was cramped and miserably sea-sick; whilst the book is almost entirely about his expeditions on land." (Freeman).Freeman 244‎

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‎DARWIN, CHARLES.‎

Reference : 38650

(1876)

‎Rejse om Jorden. PopulÊre Skildringer. Efter den engelske Originals nyeste, af Forfatteren gjennemsete Udgave. Paa Dansk ved Emil Chr. Hansen og Alfred JÞrgensen. Med Illustrationer i Tontryk, et Kort i Farvetryk samt Forfatterens PortrÊt og Biografi.‎

‎KjÞbenhavn, BrÞdrene Salmonsen, 1876. Samtidigt hldrbd. med rygforgyldning. Lttere brugsspor ved kanter. XXIII,570,(1) pp., portrÊt, et foldekort, 7 tonede litografier. Indvendigt rent frisk eksemplar.‎


‎First Danish edition of "Journal of Recherches into the natural history and geology of the countries visited during the voyage of H.M.S. Beagle round the world, under the command of Capt. Fitz Roy. 1839." - Freeman No. 174.‎

Herman H. J. Lynge & Son - Copenhagen

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DKK1,500.00 (€201.18 )

‎DARWIN, CHARLES.‎

Reference : 45528

(1876)

‎Rejse om Jorden. PopulÊre Skildringer. Efter den engelske Originals nyeste, af Forfatteren gjennemsete Udgave. Paa Dansk ved Emil Chr. Hansen og Alfred JÞrgensen.‎

‎KÞbenhavn., BrÞdrene Salmonsen, 1876. Lex8vo. Cont.hcalf., four rasied bands and richly gilt spine. Portrait. XXIII,570 pp., textillustr., 7 litographed plates and 1 lithographed folding map. A fine clean copy.‎


‎First Danish Edition of "Journal of researches into the natural history and geology of the Countries visited during the Voyage of H.M.S. Beagle round the World under the Command of Capt. Fitz Roy". 1839. - Freeman No. 174.‎

Herman H. J. Lynge & Son - Copenhagen

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DKK1,850.00 (€248.13 )

‎DARWIN, CHARLES.‎

Reference : 27627

(1876)

‎Rejse om Jorden. PopulÊre Skildringer. Paa Dansk ved Emil Chr. Hansen og Alfred JÞrgensen. Med Illustrationer i Tontryk, et Kort i Farvetryk samt Forfatterens PortrÊt og Biografi.‎

‎Kbhvn., Salmonsen, 1876. Samt. hldrbd. Rygforgyldning. Ryg med brugsspor og slidt ved Þvre kapitÊl. Startende revnedannelse Þverst ved false. XXIII,570,(1) pp. PortrÊt, 1 foldekort, 7 tonede litografier.‎


‎First Danish edition of "Journal of researches into the natural history and geology of the countries visitted during the voyage of H.M.S. Beagle round the world, under the Command of Capt. Fitz Roy". 1839. - Freeman No 174.‎

Herman H. J. Lynge & Son - Copenhagen

Phone number : +45 33 155 335

DKK1,200.00 (€160.95 )

‎DARWIN, CHARLES.‎

Reference : 39460

(1876)

‎Rejse om Jorden. PopulÊre Skildringer. Paa Dansk ved Emil Chr. Hansen og Alfred JÞrgensen. Med Illustrationer i Tontryk, et Kort i Farvetryk samt Forfatterens PortrÊt og Biografi.‎

‎Kbhvn., Salmonsen, 1876. Samt. hldrbd. Rygforgyldning. Ryg med brugsspor og kapitÊler slidte, rep. Stempel pÃ¥ titelbladet. XXIII,570,(1) pp. PortrÊt, 1 foldekort, 7 tonede litografier. Indvendig ren.‎


‎First Danish edition of "Journal of researches into the natural history and geology of the countries visitted during the voyage of H.M.S. Beagle round the world, under the Command of Capt. Fitz Roy". 1839. - Freeman No 174.‎

Herman H. J. Lynge & Son - Copenhagen

Phone number : +45 33 155 335

DKK1,000.00 (€134.12 )

‎[DARWIN, CHARLES].‎

Reference : 56728

(1847)

‎[review of] A Natural History of the Mammalia. ... By G. G. Waterhouse, esq., of the British Museum - [PRECEDING THE ORIGIN OF SPECIES BY MORE THAN TEN YEARS]‎

‎London, Taylor and Francis, 1847. 8vo. In a nice later half morocco binding with five raised bands and gilt lettering to spine. Blind stamped to upper out corner of first leaf of table of contents. In "The Annals and Magazine of Natural History", volume 19. A very fine and clean copy. [Darwin's paper] pp. 53-56. [Entire volume: VII, (1), 480 pp. + 14 plates. ‎


‎Very rare early publication by Darwin, preceding the Origin by more than ten years, with close connections to his interest in the origin of species. A lengthy (3-page) review by Darwin of his friend and colleague George Waterhouse's comprehensive description of all the species of mammals then known. Amongst a number of intriguing passages, Darwin's review includesthe following very suggestive sentence: "A distinguishing feature in this work is the notice of all fossil species, interpolated in their proper places; hence, when the whole is completed, we shall have a comprehensive view of the entire class of Mammalia, as far asknown; and the accident of extinction will not remove from the series, as is too often the case, in systematic works, allied or intermediate forms". [present work, p. 54].A frequent visitor to Down House, Waterhouse 1 was at the time Keeper of Geology at the British Museum (on Darwin's recommendation.) Darwin's friendship with Waterhouse was longstanding: he had invited Waterhouse toaccompany him on the Beagle voyage (1831-1836) some fifteen years earlier, although in the event Waterhouse had been unable to take up the invitation. On Darwin's return to England however Waterhouse wrote the Mammalia volume of Darwin's 5 volume Zoology of the Voyage of HMS Beagle."Darwin and Waterhouse exchanged several letters, often discussing issues of the classification of species. Importantly, Darwin suggests to Waterhouse the idea of 'grouping beings' according to their 'descent from commonstock' in a letter of 1843" (https://www.darwinproject.ac.uk/george-robert-waterhouse). The passage in question, in a letter from Darwin to Waterhouse of 26 July 1843, is as follows:"My dear Waterhouse - Now for a letter in answer to your two ones on classification-on which I have been often thinking ... According to my opinion, (which I give every one leave to hoot at, like I should have, six yearssince, hooted at them, for holding like views) classification consists in grouping beings according to their actual relationship, ie their consanguinity, or descent from common stocks- In this view all relations of analogy &c &c&, consist of those resemblances between two forms, which they do not owe to having inherited it, from a common stock" (https://www.darwinproject.ac.uk/letter/DCP-LETT-684.xml)Freeman 1675.‎

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