‎BARBUSSE HENRI‎
‎LIGHT‎

‎J. M. Dent & Sons Ltd. 1919. In-8 Carré. Relié. Etat d'usage. Couv. légèrement passée. Dos fané. Intérieur acceptable. 308 pages. Dos légèrement taché. Annotations en page de garde.‎

Reference : RO60072543


‎Trans. from the French by FITZWATER WRAY.‎

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5 book(s) with the same title

‎RITTER, (JOHANN W.). - THE DISCOVERY OF "CHEMICAL RAYS" - ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT AND RADIATION.‎

Reference : 43492

‎Announcing his discovery of ultraviolet light "Von den Herren Ritter und Bückmann. - - Am 22sten Febr. habe ich auch auf der Seite des Violetts im Farbespectrum, ausserhalb desselben, Sonnenstrahlen angetroffen....‎

‎Halle, Rengerschen Buchhandlung, 1801. Without wrappers as published in "Annalen der Physik. Herausgegeben von Ludwig Wilhelm Gilbert", Bd. 7, Viertes Stück. The entire issue offered (=Heft 4). Pp. 387-528. Ritter's announcement p. 525. With titlepage to volume 7. Clean and fine. Titlepage a bit shavedin inner margin. First printing of Ritter's announcement of his discovery of ultraviolet light in a halfpage letter addressed to Gilbert's Annalen. With that discovery, it became clear that visible light represents no more than a fraction of a continous spectrum.<br><br>A year earlier, in 1800, William Herschel discovered infrared light. This was the first time that a form of light beyond visible light had been detected. After hearing about Herschel's discovery of an invisible form of light beyond the red portion of the spectrum, Ritter decided to conduct experiments to determine if invisible light existed beyond the violet end of the spectrum as well. He had heard that blue light caused a greater reaction in silver chloride than red light did. Ritter decided to measure the rate at which silver chloride reacted to the different colors of light. He directed sunlight through a glass prism to create a spectrum. He then placed silver chloride in each color of the spectrum and found that it showed little change in the red part of the spectrum, but darkened toward the violet end of the spectrum. Johann Ritter then decided to place silver chloride in the area just beyond the violet end of the spectrum, in a region where no sunlight was visible. To his amazement, this region showed the most intense reaction of all. This showed for the first time that an invisible form of light existed beyond the violet end of the visible spectrum. This new type of light, which Ritter called Chemical Rays, later became known as ultraviolet light or ultraviolet radiation (the word ultra means beyond). - Parkinson, Breakthroughs: 1801 P.‎


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‎FIZEAU, ARMAND HIPPOLYTE - ANNOUNCING FIZEAU EXPERIMENT ON THE VELOCITY OF LIGHT IN MEDIA.‎

Reference : 47033

‎Sur les Hypothèses relatives a Lèther lumineux. Et sur une expérience qui parait démontrer que le mouvement des corps change la vitesse avec laquelle la lumiere se propage dans leur interieur; (Extrait par l'auteur). (The Hypotheses Relating to the Luminous Aether, and an Experiment which Appears to Demonstrate that the Motion of Bodies Alters the Velocity with which Light Propagates itself in their Interior).‎

‎Paris, Bachelier, 1851. 4to. No wrappers. In: "Comptes Rendus Hebdomadaires des Séances de L'Academie des Sciences", Tome 33, No 13. With htitle and titlepage to tome 33. Pp. 329-360 (entire issue offered). Fizeau's paper: pp. 349-355. A stamp on erso of titlepage. Titlepage with faint brownspots. First appearance of this paper, the first announcment of Fizeau's results of his experiments with the velocity of light.<br><br>"It (the paper) is less famous, for some reason, than the failure of Michelson and Morley to detect the aether drag, but NO LESS SIGNIFICANT. For it showed that the velocity of light increases in a medium according to the formula, v (1 - 1/n2), where v is the velocity of the medium, and n is the refractive index"(Gillespie in "The Edge of Objecticity" p. 427). Fizeau shows that the velocity of light is higher in water flowing in the direction of the beam than that of light propagating in the direction opposite the direction of flow. The paper offered is the shorter announcement of the research, the paper in full was published later in 1859 in "Annales de Chimie et de Physique". Albert Einstein later pointed out the IMPORTENCE OF THE EXPERIMENT FOR SPECIAL RELATIVITY.<br>Fizeau's result was replicated by Albert Michelson and Edward Morley in 1886 repeated the experiment on a larger scale and confirmed Fizeau's results., and in 1914 it was confirmed by Pieter Zeeman. It was Arago in 1838, who suggested this "crucial experiment" to decide between the corpuscular and undulatory theories of light by comparing the speed of light in water and in air.. It vindicated the undulatory position.<br><br>It was shown by Hendrik Lorentz (1892, 1895) that the experiment can be explained by the reaction of the moving water upon the interfering waves without the need of any aether entrainment. On this occasion, Lorentz introduced a different time coordinate for moving bodies within the aether, the so called Local time (an early form of the Lorentz transformation for small velocities compared to the speed of light). In 1895, Lorentz went a step further and explained the coefficient by local time alone and without mentioning any interaction of light and matter.‎


Herman H. J. Lynge & Son - Copenhagen

Phone number : +45 33 155 335

DKK5,000.00 (€670.61 )

‎FIZEAU, ARMAND HIPPOLYTE - ANNOUNCING FIZEAU EXPERIMENT ON THE VELOCITY OF LIGHT IN MEDIA.‎

Reference : 49596

‎Sur les Hypothèses relatives a Lèther lumineux. Et sur une expérience qui parait démontrer que le mouvement des corps change la vitesse avec laquelle la lumiere se propage dans leur interieur; (Extrait par l'auteur). (The Hypotheses Relating to the Luminous Aether, and an Experiment which Appears to Demonstrate that the Motion of Bodies Alters the Velocity with which Light Propagates itself in their Interior).‎

‎Paris, Bachelier, 1851. 4to. No wrappers. In: "Comptes Rendus Hebdomadaires des Séances de L'Academie des Sciences", Tome 33, No 13. With htitle and titlepage to tome 33. Pp. (329-) 360 (entire issue offered). Fizeau's paper: pp. 349-355. A stamp on upper right corner of title-page and a perforated stamp in lower margin of title-page. Clean and fine. First appearance of this paper, the first announcment of Fizeau's results of his experiments with the velocity of light.<br><br>"It (the paper) is less famous, for some reason, than the failure of Michelson and Morley to detect the aether drag, but NO LESS SIGNIFICANT. For it showed that the velocity of light increases in a medium according to the formula, v (1 - 1/n2), where v is the velocity of the medium, and n is the refractive index"(Gillespie in "The Edge of Objecticity" p. 427). Fizeau shows that the velocity of light is higher in water flowing in the direction of the beam than that of light propagating in the direction opposite the direction of flow. The paper offered is the shorter announcement of the research, the paper in full was published later in 1859 in "Annales de Chimie et de Physique". Albert Einstein later pointed out the IMPORTENCE OF THE EXPERIMENT FOR SPECIAL RELATIVITY.<br>Fizeau's result was replicated by Albert Michelson and Edward Morley in 1886 repeated the experiment on a larger scale and confirmed Fizeau's results., and in 1914 it was confirmed by Pieter Zeeman. It was Arago in 1838, who suggested this "crucial experiment" to decide between the corpuscular and undulatory theories of light by comparing the speed of light in water and in air.. It vindicated the undulatory position.<br><br>It was shown by Hendrik Lorentz (1892, 1895) that the experiment can be explained by the reaction of the moving water upon the interfering waves without the need of any aether entrainment. On this occasion, Lorentz introduced a different time coordinate for moving bodies within the aether, the so called Local time (an early form of the Lorentz transformation for small velocities compared to the speed of light). In 1895, Lorentz went a step further and explained the coefficient by local time alone and without mentioning any interaction of light and matter.‎


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DKK5,500.00 (€737.67 )

‎LORENZ, L. (LUDWIG VALENTIN) - LIGHT IS IDENTICAL WITH ELECTROMECANICAL WAVES.‎

Reference : 55371

‎Om Identiteten af Lyssvingninger og elektriske Stømme. (On the Identity of the Vibrations of Light with electrical Currents).‎

‎(København, 1867). Contemp. marbled clothbacked boards. Titlelabel with gilt lettering on upper cover. Pp. 26-45. Extracted from "Oversigt over det Kgl. danskeVidenskabernes Selskabs Forhandlinger 1867, Nr. 1". Extremely scarce first edition of the paper in which Lorenz, independent of Maxwell, stated that light is electromechanical in nature, probably inspired by his former teacher H. C. Oersted, the discoverer of electromagnetism and professor at the Polytechnic College, he aimed at unifying the forces of nature without introducing new physical hypotheses. "The idea that the various forces in nature are merely different manifestations of the one and same force has proved itself more fertile than all physical theories".<br><br><br>Most impressive of all Lorenz achievements in optics is his electromagnetic theory of light, developed in a relatively unknown paper of 1867, two years after Maxwells famous paper on the same subject. At that time Lorenz did not know Maxwells theory, and his own approach was quite different. Lorenz electromagnetic theory of light can be described briefly as an interpretation of the light vector as the current density vector in a medium obeying Ohms law. This paper contains the fundamental equations for the vector potential and the scalar potential or - for the first time - the corresponding retarded potentials expressed in terms of the current density vector and the electrical charge density. The concept of retarded potentials had already been introduced in an earlier paper by Lorenz in connection with research on the theory of elasticity. He found that the differential equation for the current density vector was the same as his fundamental wave equation for the light vector, completed with a term which explains the absorption of light in conducting media, and that his theory led to the correct value for the velocity of light." (Mogens Pihl in DSB).<br><br>The paper was published in English, 1867 "On the identity of the vibrations of light with electrical currents." (Philosophical Magazine 34: 287-301) and also in German in "Annalen der Physik"‎


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‎FRESNEL, AUGUSTIN ( ARAGO, AMPÉRE, BIOT, FOURIER). - THE FINAL DOWNFALL OF THE CORPUSCULAR THEORY OF LIGHT.‎

Reference : 44516

‎Mémoire sur la Diffraction de la lumière, où l'on examine particululièrement le phénomène des franges colorées que présentent les ombres des corps éclairés par un point lumineux. - Extrait d'une Lettre de M. Fresnel à M. Arago, sur l'influence de la chaleur dans les couleurs développées par la polarisation. Etc. Etc. Etc. A collection of the 28 milestone papers which established the wave theory of light‎

‎Paris, Crochard, 1816-25. Bound in 2 fine recent hmorocco. In: "Annales de Chimie et de Physique, Redigées par MM. Gay-Lussac et Arago", Tome I, IV, IX, X, XI, XV, XVII, XX, XXI, XXIII, XXVIII and XXIX. Some memoirs with scattered brownspots. All but volume 15 with the orig. titlepages to the volumes. Vol. XV having instead of the titlepage, a sample of the orig. printed wrappers, December issue 1820. Bound at end of volume 2. The memoir, no. 25a below is inserted at the end of volume 2. Some of the memoirs having textillustrations. Some versos of titlepages with stamps. First appearances of this groundbreaking series of papers and memoirs in which Fresnel established the scientific basis for the wave theory of light and gave the theoretical framework for explaining, in the context of his theory of the transversal nature of lightwaves, the phenomena of double refraction, refraction, dispersion, polarization, interference, diffraction patterns, diffraction fringes as light spreads around objects, etc. He developed mathematically the hypothesis of the wave nature of light and he demonstrates its conformity with experience. His study of light was a dynamic interplay between theory and observation, between mathematics and experiment. - The offered series also comprises the contributions from Arago and the rapports from The French Academy's committees by Ampère, Biot and Fourier - see below nos. 6,11,14,15,a.nd 18.<br><br>"From the point of view of method, his investigations extended from the manual operations of the laboratory to the most abstract mathematical analyses. Few physicists since Newton had been so versatile."(Silliman in "Historical Studies in the Physical Sciences", vol. 4, p. 155.).<br><br>"The wave-thory at this time was still encumbered with difficulties. Diffraction was not satisfactorily explained; for polarization no explanation of any kind was forthcoming; the Huygenian construction appeared to require two different luminiferous media within double refracting bodies; and the universality of that construction had been impugned by Brewster's discovery of biaxial crystals. The upholders of the emission theory, emboldened by the success of Laplace's theory of double refraction, thought the time ripe for their final triunph; and as a step to this, in March 1817 they proposed Diffration as the subject of the Academy's prize for 1818. Their expectation was disappointed; and the successful memoir afforded the first of a series of reverses of which, in the short space of seven years, the corpuscular theory was completely owerthrown. The author was Augustin Fresnel..."(Whittaker "A History of the Theories of Aether & Electricity", vol. 1, p.107 ff.).<br><br>"This concept of transverse waves met with the greatest hostility from the scientists of the day, who could not imagine an extremely fluid and rarified ether which at the same time possessed the mechanical properties of a rigid body. Even Arago admitted that he could not follow the exuberant engineer in his ideas. ButFresnel was convinced that at last he had the key to many mysteries, and with his model of waves he gave a full clarification of the phenomena of polarization. With insuperable precision he explained a long series of extremely complicated experiments, such as those of chromatic polarization that Arago himself had discovered by chance in 1811, and which the followers of Newton could not explain in spite of all their efforts. Following this line Fresnel reached the synthesis which is his masterpiece....we must recall the final interpretation that he gave of the famous phenomenon of partial reflection by transparent surfaces, that simple phenomenon which until then had puzzled Grimaldi, Newton, and Huygens, and which in Malus's experiments had unexpectedly acquired a special importencee as it had been compared to the great mystery of double refraction."(Ronchi "The Nature of Light", p. 255 ff.).<br><br>Comprising:<br>1. Mémoire sur la Diffraction de la lumière, où l'on examine particululièrement le phénomène des franges colorées que présentent les ombres des corps éclairés par un point lumineux. "Ann.Chim.P." Tome 1. 1816. With titlepage to vol. 1. Pp. 239-281 and 1 folded engraved plate.<br>2. Extrait d'une Lettre de M. Fresnel à M. Arago, sur l'influence de la chaleur dans les couleurs développées par la polarisation.Tome 4. 1817. With titlepage to vol. 4. Pp. 298-300.<br>3. Lettre de M. Fresnel à M. Arago, sur l'influence du mouvement terrestres dans quelques phénomènes terrestres dans quelques phénoménes d'optique. Tome 9. 1818. With titlepage to vol. 18. Pp. 57-70.<br>4. Note additionelle à la Lettre de M. Fresnel à M. Arago, insérée dans le dernier Cahier des Annales. Tome 9. 1818. Pp. 286-287.<br>5. FRESNEL & ARAGO. Sur l'Action que le rayons de lumiére polarisés exercent les uns sur les autres. Tome 10. 1819. With titlepage to vol. 10. Pp. 288-305. - Also with "Extrait d'un ouvrage du P. Grimaldi intitulé: Traité physico-mathérmatique de la lumiere des couleurs et de l'iris". Pp. 306-312.<br>6. ARAGO. Rapport par M. Arago à l'Academie des Sciences, au nom de la Commission qui avait été chargée d'examiner les Mémoires envoyés au concours pour le prix de la diffraction. Tome 11. 1819. With titlepage to vol. 11. Pp. 5-30.<br>7. Mémoire sur la Diffraction de la Lumiere. (Extrait). (This importent Price-Memoir was only printed in full in 1826). Tome 11. 1819. Pp. 246-296.<br>8. Suite Du Mémoire sur la Diffraction de la Lumière. Tome 11. 1819. Pp. 337-378. + Note sur des Essais ayant pour but de décomposer l'eau avec un aimant. Pp. 219-222.<br>9. Note sur des Essais ayant pour but de décomposer l'eau avec un aimant. Tome 15. 1820. Pp. 219-222. No titlepage to vol. 15.<br>10. Résume d'un Mémoire sur la Reflexion de la lumière. Tome 15. 1820. Pp. 379-386. Tome 15 is here represented with the last issue of the year (Decembre 1820, pp. 337-448) and instead of the titlepage having the orig. printed wrappers (bound at end of the second volume).<br>11. ARAGO & AMPÈRE. Rapport fait à l'Academie des Sciences, le lundi 4 juin 1821, sur un Mémoire de M. Fresnel relatif aux couleurs des lames cristallisées douées de la double réfraction. Tome 17. 1821. Titlepage to vol. 17. Pp. 80-102.<br>12. Note sur le Calcul des teintes que la polarisation développe dans les lames cristallisées. Tome 17. 1821. Pp. 102-111.<br>13. IIe Note sur la Coloration des lames cristallisées. Tome 17. 1821. Pp. (167-)196.<br>14. BIOT. Remarques de M. Biot sur un Rapport lu, le 4 juin 1821, à l'Academie des Sciences, par MM. Arago et Ampere. Tome 17. 1821. Pp. 225-258.<br>15. ARAGO. Examen des Remarques de M. Biot. Tome 17. 1821. Pp. 258-273. <br>16. Addition à la IIe Note insérée dans le Cahier précédent, par M. Fresnel. Tome 17. 1821. Pp. 312-315.<br>17. Note sur les remarques de M. Biot, publiées dans le Cahier précédent. Tome 17. 1821. Pp. 393-403.<br>18. FOURIER, AMPÈRE ET ARAGO. Rapport fait à l'Academie sur un Mémoire de M. Fresnel, relatif à la double réfraction. Commission: Fourier, Ampère et Arago. Tome 20, 1822. With titlepage to vol. 20. Pp. 337-344.<br>19. Note sur la double réfraction du verre comprimé. Tome 20. 1822. Pp. 376-383.<br>20. Explication de la Réfraction dans le système des ondes. Tome 21, 1822. Titlepage to vol. 21. Pp. 225-241. + LAGRANGE. Sur la Théorie de la lumière d'Huygens. Pp. 241-246.<br>21. Sur l'Ascension des nuages dans l'atmosphère. Tome 21, 1822. Pp. 260-263.<br>22. Réponse de M. Fresnel à la Lettre de M. Poisson insérée dans le tome XXII des Annales, p. 270. Tome 23, 1823. Titlepage to vol. 23. Pp. 32-49.<br>23. Note sur le Phénomène des anneaux colorés. Tome 23, 1823. Pp. 129-134.<br>24. Suite de la Réponse de M.A. Fresnel à la Lettre de M. Poisson. Tome 23, 1823. Pp. 113-122.<br>25. Extrait d'un Mémoire sur la double Réfraction particulière que présente le cristal de roche dans la irection de son axe. Tome 28, <br> 1825. Titlepage to vol. 28. Pp. 147-161. + (25 a) Extrait d'un Mémoire sur la double Réfraction. Tome 28, 1825. Pp. 263-279. <br> (According to Buchwald "The Rise of the Wave Theory opf Light" , p. 462, these 2 extracts composes the entire memoire.<br>26. Note sur la Répulsion que des corps échauffés exercent les uns sur les autres à des distances sensibles. (Lue à l'Institut le 13 juin 1825). Tome 29, 1825. Titlepage to vol. 29. Pp. 57-62.<br>27. Extrait d'un Mémoire sur la Loi des modifications imprimées à la lumière polarisée par sa réflexion totale dans l'intérieur des corps transparens. Tome 29, 1825. Pp. 175-187. (This paper was never printed in full).‎


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